Research in Learning Technology https://journal.alt.ac.uk/index.php/rlt Association for Learning Technology en-US Research in Learning Technology 2156-7069 <p>Authors contributing to <a href="https://journal.alt.ac.uk/index.php/rlt" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Research in Learning Technology</em></a> retain the copyright of their article and at the same time agree to publish their articles under the terms of the Creative Commons CC-BY 4.0 License (<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/</a>) allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, and to remix, transform, and build upon the material, for any purpose, even commercially, under the condition that <span style="text-decoration: underline;">appropriate credit</span> is given, that a link to the license is provided, and that you <span style="text-decoration: underline;">indicate if changes were made</span>. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.<br><br><br></p> Smartphones as digital instructional interface devices: the teacher’s perspective https://journal.alt.ac.uk/index.php/rlt/article/view/2639 <p>Globally, many nations have put in place policies on technology enhanced teaching and learning in an effort to keep abreast with the rapid advancement in technology. However, the use of technology in education has been slow in many third world countries, inclusive of Zimbabwe. COVID-19 restrictions inadvertently accelerated the adoption of digital instructional interface devices (DIIDs). Smartphones are preferred DIIDs because of their popularity amongst children as well as teachers. However, their successful penetration as DIIDs is largely dependent on teachers’ dispositions as key agents of curriculum implementation. Zimbabwe is known to have a 52% smartphone penetration rate for all citizens. The study was therefore carried out to determine the penetration rate of smartphones in science teachers, and also to probe teachers’ views on learners being allowed unlimited access to smartphones. The study adopted descriptive survey design from a quantitative research approach. Data was collected from 179 science teachers through a self-developed electronic questionnaire that was administered through the Kobo Toolbox online survey application. Results show that the smartphone penetration rate in science teachers is 87%. Multitasking and indecent exposure are the main forms of learner deviance that make teachers more reluctant to accept smartphones as DIIDs. In the presence of school-wide and classroom policies that cater for both merits of smartphone use and ease of policy enforcement, Zimbabwe science teachers are however ready to fully embrace smartphones as useful DIIDs.</p> Terrence Manyeredzi Vongai Mpofu Copyright (c) 2022 Terrence Manyeredzi, Vongai Mpofu http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2022-01-11 2022-01-11 30 10.25304/rlt.v30.2639