Internet self-efficacy does not predict student use of Internet-mediated educational technology

  • Tom Buchanan Department of Psychology, University of Westminster, UK
  • Sanjay Joban Department of Psychology, University of Westminster, UK
  • Alan Porter Department of Psychology, University of Westminster, UK
Keywords: Internet self-efficacy, student, blog, wiki, VLE

Abstract

Two studies tested the hypothesis that use of learning technologies among undergraduate psychology students was associated with higher Internet self-efficacy (ISE). In Study 1, the ISE scores of 86 students were found not to be associated with either attitudes towards, or measured use of, blogs and wikis as part of an IT skills course. ISE was associated with time spent online, and positive attitudes to wikis were associated with higher use. Study 2 measured 163 students’ ISE scores at the beginning and end of the same course. ISE was again not correlated with attitudes towards, or actual measured use of, learning technologies used in the course. However, ISE was shown to increase during the course. Positive attitudes towards wikis and discussion boards were associated with higher use of each. Overall, ISE scores did not influence measured use of a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE, including blogs, wikis and a discussion board), or attitudes towards those technologies. This implies that while ISE is linked to aspects of online behaviour (time spent online) and can be modified by online activity or training, it does not predict student use of educational Internet technologies.

Keywords: Internet self-efficacy; student; blog; wiki; VLE

(Published: 19 August 2014)

Citation: Research in Learning Technology 2014, 22: 19585 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/rlt.v22.19585

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Published
2014-08-19
How to Cite
Buchanan, T., Joban, S., & Porter, A. (2014). Internet self-efficacy does not predict student use of Internet-mediated educational technology. Research in Learning Technology, 22. https://doi.org/10.3402/rlt.v22.19585
Section
Original Research Articles