UK higher education institutions’ technology-enhanced learning strategies from the perspective of disruptive innovation

  • Michael Flavin King's College London
  • Valentina Quintero King's College London
Keywords: disruptive innovation, technology-enhanced learning, strategy, higher education

Abstract

The publication of institutional strategies for learning, teaching and assessment in UK higher education is practically ubiquitous. Strategies for technology-enhanced learning are also widespread. This article examines 44 publically available UK university strategies for technology-enhanced learning, aiming to assess the extent to which institutional strategies engage with and accommodate innovation in technology-enhanced learning. The article uses qualitative content analysis as its method, and uses the categories of disruptive innovation, sustaining innovation and efficiency innovation to evaluate individual institutional strategies. The article argues that sustaining innovation and efficiency innovation are more commonplace in the strategies than disruptive innovation, a position which is misaligned with the technology practices of students and lecturers.

Published: 2 March 2018

Citation: Research in Learning Technology 2018, 26: 1987 - http://dx.doi.org/10.25304/rlt.v26.1987

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Author Biographies

Michael Flavin, King's College London

Michael Flavin is Head of Curriculum Innovation at King’s College London. He holds two doctorates: one in technology-enhanced learning, and one in English. His main research interest is in using Disruptive Innovation theory as a lens to examine technology-enhanced learning. 

Valentina Quintero, King's College London

Valentina Quintero is a final year undergraduate student at King’s College London, studying BA Hons. English Language and Linguistics.

Published
2018-03-02
How to Cite
Flavin, M., & Quintero, V. (2018). UK higher education institutions’ technology-enhanced learning strategies from the perspective of disruptive innovation. Research in Learning Technology, 26. https://doi.org/10.25304/rlt.v26.1987
Section
Original Research Articles